none have or none has

Grammar question: None of them has, or none of them have .

Dec 16, 2010· Best Answer: Technically, "none has" is correct, but it really depends on how you mean it. If using "have" seems to make more sense in your sentence, go ahead and use it. All of the cake has been eaten. None of the has been eaten. All of the cookies have been eaten. None of …

Use "have" or "has" any/anyone/anything in the question?

Actually, the fact that it's a question allows the use of any and other NPIs: the related statement *Anyone has seen it is ungrammatical. JohnLawler good point. Very little does, after all. Verb agreement only occurs in one person, one number, and one tense in English, and only on the first verb in a phrase.

Is "None" Singular or Plural? | Writer's Digest

Jun 14, 2011· None of the apple was eaten. Apple is a singular item, so you'd use the singular verb "was." None of the ballplayers were on the team bus after the game. Here, "none" refers to "not any of the ballplayers" just as much as it refers to "not one of the ballplayers," so it can be plural.

Have none of (something) - Idioms by The Free Dictionary

Definition of have none of (something) in the Idioms Dictionary. have none of (something) phrase. What does have none of (something) expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary. Have none of (something) - Idioms by The Free Dictionary.

none of them has or none of them have | The Grammar Exchange

Jan 05, 2009· Phrase: none of them has or none of them have OED says: Some traditionalists maintain that none can only take a singular verb (as in none of them is coming tonight rather than none of them are coming tonight).

None Were vs. None Was - Grammar and Punctuation

Jun 14, 2009· However, none has been used with both singular and plural verbs since the 9th century. When the sense is "not any persons or things" (as in the example above), the plural is more common: … none were found. Only when none is clearly intended to mean "not one" or "not any" is it followed by.

none have or none has,

Does "None" Take A Singular Or Plural Verb? - Everything .

"Not any" (None of the pizza is left) "No part, nothing" (I'll have none of your backtalk!) Sometimes, the "nothing" that none conveys refers to more than one thing: "not any persons or things." In this situation, none takes a plural verb, e.g., The pizzas we ordered for …

Which is correct, "One of them has/have"? - Quora

Jan 26, 2018· The correct answer is "One of them has…" Subject-verb agreement is one of the most confusing things in English grammar. I come across a number of people who tend to use the wrong form of the verb for a particular subject. The rule is simple. If yo.

Grammar question: None of them has, or none of them have .

Dec 16, 2010· Here's the graph of "none of them has" against "none of them have". You can see from it that both are in significant use. The plural form dominated until 1920, when the singular form overtook it in 192. However, in the late 1900s the plural form gained ground again, and become slightly more frequent in the early 2000s.

grammar - None have showed up? Huh? - English Language .

None have has been around for at least 350 years. Even Fowler writing in 1926 said that it was a mistake to suppose that none 'must at all costs be followed by a singular verb.' Even Fowler writing in 1926 said that it was a mistake to suppose that none 'must at all costs be followed by a singular verb.'

none_1 pronoun - Definition, pictures, pronunciation and .

When you use none of with a plural noun or pronoun, or a singular noun referring to a group of people or things, you can use either a singular or a plural verb. The singular form is used in a formal style in British English:None of the trains is/​are going to London. None of her family has/​have been to college.

None Have Or None Has? - ENGLISH FORUMS

Oct 16, 2012· +1. It depends on the noun being modified. If the noun is uncountable, a singular verb is required. None (of the beer) has come in yet. If it's countable, however, the choice is yours. None can be taken to mean not one (singular) or not any (plural). Personally, I always use a plural verb.

None | Definition of None by Lexico

'Patterson is itching to make his comeback, but the media will have none of it, for now.' 'All the members of the family plead with her to give the marriage a last chance but she will have none of it.' 'I try to entice him with the biggest hedge maze in the world and a seal sanctuary but he will have none of it.'

prepositions - Verb forms for "any" and "none" — have or .

None means 'not one' or 'not any' and it may take either a singular or plural verb. Writers are more or less free to decide which meaning is appropriate in their context. This grammatical construction, which is based on sense rather than form, is called notional agreement or notional concord, and is very common.

None have or none has - answers

There is none There is none There is none There is none There is none Which one has no endpoints and continues on in both diretions? None of the following - since there are none!

Top 10 grammar myths: none always takes a singular verb .

When none is followed by a mass noun (a noun that cannot be counted or made plural) it takes a singular verb. None of the wine was drunk. (wine = mass noun) Singular or plural usage. When none means no one or not any, use whichever verb makes more sense. None of the printers are working. None of the printers is working. None of you are guilty.

"None of us has" or "none of us have" : grammar - reddit

Aug 30, 2016· I could be wrong, but I believe "none" is a singular pronoun, so it'd be "None of us have the key." Edit: Just checked to be sure. "None" can be either singular or plural, depending on the noun following it, in this case "us", which is plural, which would make "none" plural, so it would actually be "None of us has the key."

none_1 pronoun - Definition, pictures, pronunciation and .

When you use none of with a plural noun or pronoun, or a singular noun referring to a group of people or things, you can use either a singular or a plural verb. The singular form is used in a formal style in British English:None of the trains is/​are going to London. None of her family has/​have been to college.

None of/have or has - tolearnenglish

Re: None of/have or has from jade77, posted on 16-03-2018 at 19:44:19 (D | E) It is held that none can only take a singular verb never a plural verb . There is little …

No, none and none of - English Grammar Today - Cambridge .

None is the pronoun form of no. None means 'not one' or 'not any'. We use it as a pronoun to replace countable and uncountable nouns. We use it as subject or object: Slorne stared … and seemed to try …

None are or none is - Grammarist

Should I use a singular or plural verb with none .

How to Use Either, Neither, Or, and Nor Correctly

But if you use neither, then make sure your sentence does not have any other negatives preceding it. If you prefer to use a negative, then you want to use either. Jay had seen neither the snake nor the wasp's nest on the next tree, and was preparing to stake his tarp in that less-than-safe location.

Difference Between Non and None - DifferenceBetween

Apr 07, 2013· No, none, non, no one etc. are some of the words in English language that are very confusing for students of English. This is because of the fact that all these words have similar meanings. However, despite similarities, there are two words non and none that …

None | Definition of None by Lexico

'She will have none of it, she refuses to bow to the lowest instincts of people who are rotten to start with.' 'As for the fabled influence of women on men, Mrs. Woolf will have none of it.' 'Yet Brewer regards this as a nostalgic reverie and will have none of it.' 'But when I …

No, none and none of - English Grammar Today - Cambridge .

None is the pronoun form of no. None means 'not one' or 'not any'. We use it as a pronoun to replace countable and uncountable nouns. We use it as subject or object: Slorne stared … and seemed to try …

None of us: plural or singular? | English Grammar

Nov 01, 2013· LauraM. You are saying that there are not any people in the group but you are still referring to the single group, therefor making it singular. Actually, "none of us" is plural as typically it's the equivalent of saying "we" which is plural. But on the other hand "none" by itself can be plural or singular depending on the context.

None - definition of none by The Free Dictionary

Both options are acceptable in this sentence: None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial. When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were (not was) interviewed by the committee.

TypeError: slice indices must be integers or None or have .

When running the code in IDLE gives the following error: 2 Answers 2. In 3.x, int/int gives a float. which is not an int. makes half a float. to make half an int, as needed for its use in the slice in line 16. you saved me a lot of frustration man. thanks.! Able to work, never found to have such a usage before.

None Has Or None Have? - ENGLISH FORUMS

Jul 13, 2011· Either a singular or a plural verb is acceptably used in a sentence such as None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial. When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the …

None of them have/has? | Yahoo Answers

Dec 31, 2008· none always goes with have Many people seem to have been taught (mistakenly) that none always means "not one" (as in, None of the chickens is hatched). But most authorities have always believed that none is closer in meaning to "not any (of them)" than to "not one (of them)."

conjunctions - "None is" or "none are" - English Language .

Grammatically, both these are fine. 1: There are grammarians in this room, but none of them has the right to prohibit this usage. 2: There are grammarians in this room, but none of them have the right to prohibit this usage either. As the above links show, singular and plural are both perfectly common.